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Nat Commun. 2014 Apr 16;5:3689. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4689.

Length-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended single-layer graphene.

Author information

1
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [3] NanoCore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore [4].
2
1] Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, Mainz 55128, Germany [2].
3
State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190, China.
4
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore.
5
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [3] Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore.
6
SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea.
7
NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Singapore 117456, Singapore.
8
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [3] Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore.
9
1] Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore [2] NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Singapore 117456, Singapore.
10
Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 152-742, Republic of Korea.
11
1] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Singapore 117456, Singapore [3] Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore.
12
Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, Mainz 55128, Germany.
13
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [3] Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [4] NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Singapore 117456, Singapore.
14
1] Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [2] Graphene Research Center, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542, Singapore [3] NanoCore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore [4] NUS Graduate School for Integrative Science and Engineering, Singapore 117456, Singapore.

Abstract

Graphene exhibits extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, and extremely high thermal conductivity. Being a very stable atomically thick membrane that can be suspended between two leads, graphene provides a perfect test platform for studying thermal conductivity in two-dimensional systems, which is of primary importance for phonon transport in low-dimensional materials. Here we report experimental measurements and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conduction in suspended single-layer graphene as a function of both temperature and sample length. Interestingly and in contrast to bulk materials, at 300 K, thermal conductivity keeps increasing and remains logarithmically divergent with sample length even for sample lengths much larger than the average phonon mean free path. This result is a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of phonons in graphene, and provides fundamental understanding of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials.

PMID:
24736666
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4689
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