Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Cancer. 2014 May 27;110(11):2804-11. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.198. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types.

Author information

1
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland.
2
Health Protection Scotland, Glasgow, Scotland.
3
Scottish Human Papillomavirus Reference Laboratory, Edinburgh, Scotland.
4
1] Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland [2] Health Protection Scotland, Glasgow, Scotland [3] International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 12-13 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 12-13 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%.

METHODS:

To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV.

RESULTS:

From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS:

This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake.

PMID:
24736582
PMCID:
PMC4037824
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center