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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Jun 25;171(1-2):210-4. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.03.032. Epub 2014 Mar 31.

First isolation of border disease virus in Japan is from a pig farm with no ruminants.

Author information

1
Ibaraki Prefectural Western District Livestock Health and Hygiene Office, 42-4 Araishinden, Chikusei, Ibaraki 300-4516, Japan.
2
Ibaraki Prefectural Northern District Livestock Health and Hygiene Office, 966-1 Nakakawachi-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 310-0002, Japan.
3
Ibaraki Prefectural Rokko District Livestock Health and Hygiene Office, 1367-3 Hokota, Hokota, Ibaraki 311-1517, Japan.
4
Viral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 3-1-5 Kan-nondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856, Japan.
5
Center for Animal Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 3-1-5 Kan-nondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856, Japan.
6
Exotic Diseases Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 6-20-1 Jousuihon-cho, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-0022, Japan.
7
Center for Animal Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 3-1-5 Kan-nondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856, Japan; Exotic Diseases Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, NARO, 6-20-1 Jousuihon-cho, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-0022, Japan. Electronic address: musasabi@affrc.go.jp.

Abstract

The first isolation of border disease virus (BDV) in Japan was from a pig farm of the farrow-to-finishing type that kept no small ruminants or cattle. The infection was detected in the course of sero-surveillance for classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in Japan. The infected pigs had no clinical symptoms of CSFV or other disease; nevertheless, a high sero-positive rate of 58.5% was identified. A persistently infected pig with the BDV was found and suspected to be the cause of sero-prevalence in the farm. The isolated BDV was genetically close to BDV strains from New Zealand, but there was no epidemiological evidence concerning the route(s) of the invasion into the farm.

KEYWORDS:

Border disease virus; CSF; Genetic analysis; PI pig; Pestivirus

PMID:
24735918
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.03.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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