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FEBS Lett. 2014 May 21;588(10):1869-72. doi: 10.1016/j.febslet.2014.04.002. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

A different path: revealing the function of staphylococcal proteins in biofilm formation.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK.
  • 2Technology Facility, Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK.
  • 3Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK. Electronic address: jennifer.potts@york.ac.uk.
  • 4Department of Biology, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK. Electronic address: gavin.thomas@york.ac.uk.

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis cause dangerous and difficult to treat medical device-related infections through their ability to form biofilms. Extracellular poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) facilitates biofilm formation and is a vaccination target, yet details of its biosynthesis by the icaADBC gene products is limited. IcaC is the proposed transporter for PNAG export, however a comparison of the Ica proteins to homologous exo-polysaccharide synthases suggests that the common IcaAD protein components both synthesise and transport the PNAG. The limited distribution of icaC to the Staphylococcaceae and its membership of a family of membrane-bound acyltransferases, leads us to suggest that IcaC is responsible for the known O-succinylation of PNAG that occurs in staphylococci, identifying a potentially new therapeutic target specific for these bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Biofilm; Exo-polysaccharide secretion; O-succinylation; PNAG modification; Staphylococci

PMID:
24735724
DOI:
10.1016/j.febslet.2014.04.002
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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