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Int J Endocrinol. 2014;2014:323728. doi: 10.1155/2014/323728. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Fasting Leptin Is a Metabolic Determinant of Food Reward in Overweight and Obese Individuals during Chronic Aerobic Exercise Training.

Author information

1
Academy of Sport and Physical Activity, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP, UK ; Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.
2
Institute of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.
3
Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
4
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
5
Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Changes in food reward have been implicated in exercise-induced compensatory eating behaviour. However, the underlying mechanisms of food reward, and the physiological correlates of exercise-induced changes in food reward, are unknown.

METHODS:

Forty-six overweight and obese individuals completed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise. Body composition, food intake, and fasting metabolic-related hormones were measured at baseline, week six, and postintervention. On separate days, the reward value of high-and-low-fat food (explicit liking and implicit wanting) was also assessed at baseline, week six, and postintervention.

RESULTS:

Following the intervention, FM, FFM, and VO2peak improved significantly, while fasting leptin decreased. However, food intake or reward did not change significantly. Cross-sectional analyses indicated that FM (P = 0.022) and FFM (P = 0.046) were associated with explicit liking for high-fat food, but implicit wanting was associated with FM only (P = 0.005). Fasting leptin was associated with liking (P = 0.023) and wanting (P = 0.021) for high-fat food. Furthermore, a greater exercise-induced decline in fasting leptin was associated with increased liking (P = 0.018).

CONCLUSION:

These data indicate that food reward has a number of physiological correlates. In particular, fasting leptin appears to play an active role in mediating food reward during exercise-induced weight loss.

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