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Regul Pept. 2014 May;190-191:46-9. doi: 10.1016/j.regpep.2014.04.001. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

Serum adropin levels are decreased in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Xijing hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 Changle West Road, Xi'an 710032, PR China.
2
Department of Anaesthiology, Wuhan general Hospital of Guangzhou Command, No. 627 Wuluo Road, Wuhan, 430070, PR China.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Xijing hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 Changle West Road, Xi'an 710032, PR China. Electronic address: xijingyinwen@126.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Adropin is a recently identified bioactive protein that is important for energy homeostasis and maintaining insulin sensitivity. We sought to detect serum adropin levels in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients.

METHODS:

We enrolled 138 AMI patients, 114 stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients and 75 controls. Adropin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

RESULTS:

Serum adropin levels were significantly lower in patients with AMI compared with SAP patients or controls (P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that lower adropin was the independent predictor for the presence of AMI in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (P<0.01). Serum adropin levels were negatively associated with body mass index (BMI) (P<0.01) and triglyceride levels (P<0.05) in AMI patients.

CONCLUSION:

Decreased serum adropin levels are associated with the presence of AMI in CAD patients. These results revealed that adropin might represent as a novel biomarker for predicting AMI onset in CAD patients.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myocardial infarction; Adropin; Atherosclerosis; Biomarkers; Coronary artery disease

PMID:
24731968
DOI:
10.1016/j.regpep.2014.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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