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J Sports Sci. 2014;32(15):1435-45. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2014.900692. Epub 2014 Apr 14.

Aerobic plus resistance training was more effective in improving the visceral adiposity, metabolic profile and inflammatory markers than aerobic training in obese adolescents.

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1
a Post Graduate Program of Nutrition , Universidade Federal de São Paulo , São Paulo , Brazil.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether aerobic plus resistance training (AT + RT) is more effective than aerobic training (AT) at reducing inflammatory markers and cardiovascular risk in obese adolescents. A total of 139 obese adolescents were enrolled, aged 15-19 years, body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95th percentile and participated in 1 year of interdisciplinary intervention. They were randomised into two groups: AT (n = 55), AT + RT (n = 61). Blood samples were collected to analyse glycaemia, insulin, the lipid profile, leptin and adiponectin concentrations. Insulin resistance was measured by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). The AT + RT group showed better results with regard to decreased body fat mass, low-density lipoprotein concentration (LDL-c) levels, subcutaneous and visceral fat and increased body lean mass. Indeed, a reduction of hyperleptinaemia and an increase in adiponectin concentrations, promoting an improvement in the leptin/adiponectin ratio, was observed. Important clinical parameters were improved in both types of exercise; however, AT + RT was more effective in improving the visceral adiposity, metabolic profile and inflammatory markers than AT alone, suggesting clinical applications for the control of intra-abdominal obesity and cardiovascular risk in the paediatric population.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; exercise; obesity; visceral fat

PMID:
24730354
DOI:
10.1080/02640414.2014.900692
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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