Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int Neurourol J. 2014 Mar;18(1):23-30. doi: 10.5213/inj.2014.18.1.23. Epub 2014 Mar 31.

Clinical factors associated with dose escalation of solifenacin for the treatment of overactive bladder in real life practice.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Urology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea.
3
Department of Computer Science and Information Systems, Hanyang Women's University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the baseline clinical characteristics associated with dose escalation of solifenacin in patients with overactive bladder (OAB).

METHODS:

We analyzed the data of patients with OAB (micturition frequency ≥8/day and urgency ≥1/day) who were treated with solifenacin and followed up for 24 weeks. According to our department protocol, all the patients kept voiding diaries, and OAB symptom scores (OABSS) were monitored at baseline and after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of solifenacin treatment.

RESULTS:

In total, 68 patients (mean age, 60.8±10.0 years) were recruited. The dose escalation rate by the end of the study was 41.2%, from 23.5% at 4 weeks and 17.6% at 12 weeks. At baseline, the dose escalator group had significantly more OAB wet patients (53.6% vs. 20.0%) and higher total OABSS (10.2±2.4 vs. 7.9±3.5, P=0.032) than the nonescalator group. OAB wet (odds ratio [OR], 4.615; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.578-13.499; P<0.05) and total OABSS (OR, 1.398; 95% CI, 1.046-1.869; P<0.05) were found to be independently associated with dose escalation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients who have urgency urinary incontinence and high total OABSS have a tendency for dose escalation of solifenacin.

KEYWORDS:

Muscarinic antagonists; Overactive urinary bladder; Solifenacin

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Publishing M2Community Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center