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Aquat Toxicol. 2014 Jul;152:38-46. doi: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2014.03.021. Epub 2014 Mar 29.

Physiologically-based toxicokinetic models help identifying the key factors affecting contaminant uptake during flood events.

Author information

1
Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt - Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen, Germany.
2
Thünen-Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg, Germany.
3
Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt - Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen, Germany; Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen, Germany.
4
Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management, RWTH Aachen University, Mies-van-der-Rohe-Straße 1, 52056 Aachen, Germany.
5
Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), Department G3: Biochemistry, Ecotoxicology, Am Mainzer Tor 1, 56068 Koblenz, Germany.
6
Department of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt- Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen, Germany.
7
Department of Ecosystem Analysis, Institute for Environmental Research,ABBt - Aachen Biology and Biotechnology, RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074 Aachen, Germany; College of Resources and Environmental Science, Chongqing University, 1 Tiansheng Road, Beibei, Chongqing 400715, China; College of Environmental Science and Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, China; State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, China. Electronic address: henner.hollert@bio5.rwth-aachen.de.

Abstract

As a consequence of global climate change, we will be likely facing an increasing frequency and intensity of flood events. Thus, the ecotoxicological relevance of sediment re-suspension is of growing concern. It is vital to understand contaminant uptake from suspended sediments and relate it to effects in aquatic biota. Here we report on a computational study that utilizes a physiologically based toxicokinetic model to predict uptake, metabolism and excretion of sediment-borne pyrene in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To this end, data from two experimental studies were compared with the model predictions: (a) batch re-suspension experiments with constant concentration of suspended particulate matter at two different temperatures (12 and 24°C), and (b) simulated flood events in an annular flume. The model predicted both the final concentrations and the kinetics of 1-hydroxypyrene secretion into the gall bladder of exposed rainbow trout well. We were able to show that exhaustive exercise during exposure in simulated flood events can lead to increased levels of biliary metabolites and identified cardiac output and effective respiratory volume as the two most important factors for contaminant uptake. The results of our study clearly demonstrate the relevance and the necessity to investigate uptake of contaminants from suspended sediments under realistic exposure scenarios.

KEYWORDS:

Bioconcentration factor; PBPK; PBTK; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; SPM

PMID:
24727214
DOI:
10.1016/j.aquatox.2014.03.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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