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Curr Opin Immunol. 2014 Aug;29:16-22. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2014.03.003. Epub 2014 Apr 12.

Commensal bacteria mediated defenses against pathogens.

Author information

1
Immunology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: abtm@mskcc.org.
2
Immunology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, New York, USA; Lucille Castori Center for Microbes Inflammation and Cancer, Molecular Microbiology Core Facility, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, New York, USA; Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

Commensal bacterial communities residing within the intestinal lumen of mammals have evolved to flourish in this microenvironment. To preserve this niche, commensal bacteria act with the host to prevent colonization by invasive pathogens that induce inflammation and disrupt the intestinal niche commensal bacteria occupy. Thus, it is mutually beneficial to the host and commensal bacteria to inhibit a pathogen's ability to establish an infection. Commensal bacteria express factors that support colonization, maximize nutrient uptake, and produce metabolites that confer a survival advantage over pathogens. Further, commensal bacteria stimulate the host's immune defenses and drive tonic expression of anti-microbial factors. In combination, these mechanisms preserve the niche for commensal bacteria and assist the host in preventing infection.

PMID:
24727150
PMCID:
PMC4132187
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2014.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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