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Cell Immunol. 2014 Sep-Oct;291(1-2):41-8. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2014.03.012. Epub 2014 Apr 1.

The monocyte-macrophage axis in the intestine.

Author information

1
Centre for Immunobiology, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom.
2
Centre for Immunobiology, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Allan.Mowat@glasgow.ac.uk.

Abstract

Macrophages are one of the most abundant leucocytes in the intestinal mucosa where they are essential for maintaining homeostasis. However, they are also implicated in the pathogenesis of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), offering potential targets for novel therapies. Here we discuss the function of intestinal monocytes and macrophages during homeostasis and describe how these populations and their functions change during infection and inflammation. Furthermore, we review the current evidence that the intestinal macrophage pool requires continual renewal from circulating blood monocytes, unlike most other tissue macrophages which appear to derive from primitive precursors that subsequently self-renew.

KEYWORDS:

Homeostasis; Inflammation; Intestine; Macrophages; Monocytes

PMID:
24726741
PMCID:
PMC4217150
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellimm.2014.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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