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Prev Med. 2014 Jul;64:88-95. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.04.001. Epub 2014 Apr 12.

Telehealth interventions for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Centre for Academic Primary Care, School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, 39 Whatley Road, Clifton BS8 2PS, UK. Electronic address: sam@merriel.com.au.
2
Centre for Academic Primary Care, School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, 39 Whatley Road, Clifton BS8 2PS, UK. Electronic address: Verity.andrews@bristol.ac.uk.
3
Centre for Academic Primary Care, School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, 39 Whatley Road, Clifton BS8 2PS, UK. Electronic address: c.salisbury@bristol.ac.uk.

Erratum in

  • Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67:343.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effectiveness of telehealth interventions in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adult patients in community settings.

METHODS:

Systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of telehealth interventions to reduce overall cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and/or to reduce multiple CVD risk factors compared with a non-telehealth control group was conducted in June 2013. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Fixed and random effects models were combined with a narrative synthesis for meta-analysis of included studies.

RESULTS:

Three of 13 included studies measured Framingham 10-year CVD risk scores, and meta-analysis showed no clear evidence of reduction in overall risk (SMD -0.37%, 95% CI -2.08, 1.33). There was weak evidence for a reduction in systolic blood pressure (SMD -1.22 mmHg 95% CI -2.80, 0.35) and total cholesterol (SMD -0.07 mmol/L 95% CI -0.19, 0.06). There was no change in High-Density Lipoprotein cholesterol or smoking rates.

CONCLUSION:

There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of telehealth interventions in reducing overall CVD risk. More studies are needed that consistently measure overall CVD risk, directly compare different telehealth interventions, and determine cost effectiveness of telehealth interventions for prevention of CVD.

KEYWORDS:

CVD; Cardiovascular disease; Primary prevention; Risk factors; Telehealth; Telemedicine

PMID:
24726502
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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