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Compr Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;55(5):1137-45. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.03.005. Epub 2014 Mar 21.

Relationships that compulsive buying has with addiction, obsessive-compulsiveness, hoarding, and depression.

Author information

1
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: Lee_Lawrence@Live.com.au.
2
Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Compulsive buying has been associated with addiction, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, as well as hoarding. The present study investigated the relationship that compulsive buying (CB) has with 'addictive' (i.e., sensitivity to reward), obsessive-compulsive, and depressive phenomena, after controlling for hoarding, substance dependence, manic, and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms.

METHODS:

87 participants from a community population completed the online questionnaires for the study, however 70 participants (M=29.19, SD=10.45; 70% were female) were used in the analyses because of exclusion criteria.

RESULTS:

As expected, CB measures correlated with hoarding, depression, sensitivity to reward, and, but less so, obsessive-compulsive measures. Sensitivity to reward was the most important predictor of CB severity, compared to obsessive-compulsive and depression symptoms. Hoarding was also an important predictor of CB severity.

LIMITATIONS:

Small sample size meant gender comparisons could not be made, and the use of a novel, communicated questionnaire meant that interpretation should be considered conservatively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, findings suggest that CB may be most closely related to the phenomena associated with addiction (an increased sensitivity to reward), rather than obsessive-compulsive or depression symptoms. Hoarding and reward sensitivity perhaps might separate compulsive buying from ordinary and recreational shopping.

PMID:
24726432
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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