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J Card Fail. 2014 Jun;20(6):414-421. doi: 10.1016/j.cardfail.2014.03.009. Epub 2014 Apr 12.

Isolated right ventricular dysfunction in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

Author information

1
Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh.
2
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh.
3
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences; University of Pittsburgh.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh.
5
Department of Immunology, School of Medicine; University of Pittsburgh.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk for pulmonary hypertension and cardiomyopathy, portending a poor prognosis. Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is associated with worse outcomes in these conditions, yet its prevalence is poorly defined in HIV. We sought to determine the prevalence of RV dysfunction in an outpatient HIV cohort.

METHODS:

Echocardiograms were evaluated from 104 HIV-infected adults. Measurements included estimated pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and several measures of RV function, including tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV longitudinal myocardial strain (RVLMS), RV fractional area change (RVFAC), and myocardial performance index (MPI).

RESULTS:

Sixteen subjects (15%) had PASP >35 mm Hg, yet RV function did not differ significantly from those with normal estimated PASP. RV dysfunction defined by RVFAC <35% occurred in 11%. RVLMS had a median value of -27.3%, and individuals below the median had lower TAPSE but no differences in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), PASP, or other measures. Dyspnea was associated with the lowest quintile of RVLMS (≥-21.05%). There were 6 subjects with LVEF <50%, and these individuals had lower TAPSE but no differences in PASP or other RV functional measures.

CONCLUSIONS:

RV dysfunction was common as estimated PASP >35 mm Hg and LV dysfunction, but these findings did not cosegregate. RV dysfunction in HIV-infected individuals may be a separate entity from LV/global cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension and deserves further study.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Pulmonary hypertension; cardiomyopathy; right ventricle

PMID:
24726418
PMCID:
PMC4057918
DOI:
10.1016/j.cardfail.2014.03.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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