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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Jul;71(1):62-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2014.02.044. Epub 2014 Apr 14.

Different patterns of skin manifestations associated with parvovirus B19 primary infection in adults.

Author information

1
Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), et Université René Descartes, Paris, France.
2
Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg et Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Strasbourg, France.
3
Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU) de Nantes, Nantes, France.
4
Service de Dermatologie, CHU de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
5
Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Henri Mondor, APHP et Université Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France.
6
Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier (CH) de Fréjus, Fréjus, France.
7
Service de Rhumatologie, Hôpital Cochin, APHP, et Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France.
8
Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard, Paris, France.
9
Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP), et Université René Descartes, Paris, France. Electronic address: nicolas.dupin@cch.aphp.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skin involvement is reported during primary parvovirus B19 infection in adults.

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to describe the cutaneous presentations associated with parvovirus B19 primary infection in adults.

METHODS:

We conducted a descriptive, retrospective, multicenter study. The patients included (>18 years old) had well-established primary infections with parvovirus B19.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine patients were identified between 1992 and 2013 (17 women, 12 men). The elementary dermatologic lesions were mostly erythematous (86%) and often purpuric (69%). Pruritus was reported in 48% of cases. The rash predominated on the legs (93%), trunk (55%), and arms (45%), with a lower frequency of facial involvement (20%). Four different but sometimes overlapping patterns were identified (45%): exanthema, which was reticulated and annular in some cases (80%); the gloves-and-socks pattern (24%); the periflexural pattern (28%); and palpable purpura (24%).

LIMITATIONS:

The limitations of this study were its retrospective design and possible recruitment bias in tertiary care centers.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that primary parvovirus B19 infection is associated with polymorphous skin manifestations with 4 predominant, sometimes overlapping, patterns. The acral or periflexural distribution of the rash and the presence of purpuric or annular/reticulate lesions are highly suggestive of parvovirus B19 infection.

KEYWORDS:

exanthema; gloves and socks; infection; parvovirus B19; pruritus; purpura; virus

PMID:
24726401
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2014.02.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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