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Trends Ecol Evol. 2014 May;29(5):270-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2014.03.002. Epub 2014 Apr 11.

Assembling evidence for identifying reservoirs of infection.

Author information

1
Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. Electronic address: mafalda.viana@glasgow.ac.uk.
2
Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.
3
Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
4
Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.
5
US Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center 2327, University Way, Suite 2, Bozeman, MT 59715, USA.
6
Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Many pathogens persist in multihost systems, making the identification of infection reservoirs crucial for devising effective interventions. Here, we present a conceptual framework for classifying patterns of incidence and prevalence, and review recent scientific advances that allow us to study and manage reservoirs simultaneously. We argue that interventions can have a crucial role in enriching our mechanistic understanding of how reservoirs function and should be embedded as quasi-experimental studies in adaptive management frameworks. Single approaches to the study of reservoirs are unlikely to generate conclusive insights whereas the formal integration of data and methodologies, involving interventions, pathogen genetics, and contemporary surveillance techniques, promises to open up new opportunities to advance understanding of complex multihost systems.

PMID:
24726345
PMCID:
PMC4007595
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2014.03.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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