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Transl Oncol. 2014 Apr;7(2):230-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tranon.2014.02.009. Epub 2014 Mar 4.

Monitoring of tumor response to Cisplatin using optical spectroscopy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: j.spliethoff@nki.nl.
2
Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Division of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Minimally Invasive Healthcare, Philips Research, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; MIRA Institute, Technical University Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Anatomic imaging alone is often inadequate for tuning systemic treatment for individual tumor response. Optically based techniques could potentially contribute to fast and objective response monitoring in personalized cancer therapy. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy-autofluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-AFS) to monitor the effects of systemic treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer.

METHODS:

Brca1(-/-); p53(-/-) mammary tumors were grown in 36 mice, half of which were treated with a single dose of cisplatin. Changes in the tumor physiology and morphology were measured for a period of 1 week using dual-modality DRS-AFS. Liver and muscle tissues were also measured to distinguish tumor-specific alterations from systemic changes. Model-based analyses were used to derive different optical parameters like the scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as sources of intrinsic fluorescence. Histopathologic analysis was performed for cross-validation with trends in optically based parameters.

RESULTS:

Treated tumors showed a significant decrease in Mie-scattering slope and Mie-to-total scattering fraction and an increase in both fat volume fraction and tissue oxygenation after 2 days of follow-up. Additionally, significant tumor-specific changes in the fluorescence spectra were seen. These longitudinal trends were consistent with changes observed in the histopathologic analysis, such as vital tumor content and formation of fibrosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates that dual-modality DRS-AFS provides quantitative functional information that corresponds well with the degree of pathologic response. DRS-AFS, in conjunction with other imaging modalities, could be used to optimize systemic cancer treatment on the basis of early individual tumor response.

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