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Cell Host Microbe. 2014 Apr 9;15(4):403-11. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2014.03.012.

Self and nonself: how autophagy targets mitochondria and bacteria.

Author information

1
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Division of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK; University of Cambridge, Department of Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK. Electronic address: randow@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk.
2
Surgical Neurology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: youler@ninds.nih.gov.

Abstract

Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that transports cytoplasmic components for degradation into lysosomes. Selective autophagy can capture physically large objects, including cell-invading pathogens and damaged or superfluous organelles. Selectivity is achieved by cargo receptors that detect substrate-associated "eat-me" signals. In this Review, we discuss basic principles of selective autophagy and compare the "eat-me" signals and cargo receptors that mediate autophagy of bacteria and bacteria-derived endosymbionts-i.e., mitochondria.

PMID:
24721569
PMCID:
PMC4238923
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2014.03.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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