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Contemp Clin Trials. 2014 May;38(1):113-20. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2014.03.008. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Targeting tobacco in a community-based addiction recovery cohort: results from a computerized, brief, randomized intervention trial.

Author information

1
Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980310, Richmond, VA 23298, United States. Electronic address: abbrelan@vcu.edu.
2
Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980310, Richmond, VA 23298, United States. Electronic address: almondlm@vcu.edu.
3
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980343, Richmond, VA 23219, United States. Electronic address: jnkienzle@gmail.com.
4
Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute, Wayne State University, 71 East Ferry, Detroit, MI 48202, United States. Electronic address: s.ondersma@wayne.edu.
5
Virginia Department of Health, Crater Health District, 301 Halifax Street, Petersburg, VA 23803, United States. Electronic address: alton.hart@vdh.virginia.gov.
6
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 1941 East Road, Suite 1222, Houston, TX 77054, United States. Electronic address: Michael.F.Weaver@uth.tmc.edu.
7
Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980261, 1200 E. Clay Street, Suite 2000, Richmond, VA 23298, United States. Electronic address: pmdillon@vcu.edu.
8
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980343, Richmond, VA 23219, United States. Electronic address: dssvikis@vcu.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Nearly 80% of substance dependent individuals also use tobacco, and smoking cessation efforts during treatment for other substance use is associated with similar or even improved outcomes. However, smoking cessation is not routinely addressed during treatment for substance use disorders. The present study tested a computerized brief motivational intervention (C-BMI) for smoking cessation in an understudied population: a cohort recruited from a recovery community organization (RCO) center.

METHODS:

Following baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to either a 30-minute C-BMI plus access to free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), or an information-only control group plus NRT access.

RESULTS:

Reductions in CO were observed for both groups. Quit rates in the C-BMI group (5%-7%, vs. 0% for the control group) approximated those observed elsewhere for physician advice and minimal counseling. Participants in the C-BMI group were also more likely to express a desire to quit.

CONCLUSIONS:

Computer-delivered smoking cessation interventions within RCOs appear feasible. These organizations treat a wide variety of individuals, and C-BMIs for smoking in this context have the potential to reduce smoking-related morbidity and mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Brief interventions; Smoking cessation; Substance abuse recovery

PMID:
24721481
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2014.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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