Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Health Promot. 2015 Mar-Apr;29(4):e136-46. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.130327-QUAN-129. Epub 2014 Apr 10.

Dietary patterns as predictors of body fat and BMI in women: a factor analytic study.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify independent patterns of diet using factor analysis to determine the extent to which dietary patterns account for differences in body fat percentage (BF%) and body mass index (BMI). Also, to ascertain the extent to which the associations are influenced by age, education, menopause, energy intake, and physical activity.

DESIGN:

Study design was cross-sectional.

SETTING:

Study setting was approximately 20 cities in the Mountain West.

SUBJECTS:

The study included 281 apparently healthy female nonsmokers.

MEASURES:

Diet was assessed using 7-day weighed food records, and foods were categorized using the American Diabetes and American Dietetic Associations Exchange Lists and expressed as servings per 1000 kcal. BF% was measured using the Bod Pod, and physical activity was estimated using accelerometers worn for 1 week.

ANALYSIS:

We used factor analysis, general linear models, and partial correlations.

RESULTS:

Three dietary patterns were identified: (1) Prudent Pattern, (2) Low-fat Milk, and (3) Meat. Higher consumption of the Prudent Pattern corresponded with significantly lower BF% (F = 8.5, p = .0038) and BMI (F = 4.4, p = .0363). The Low-fat Milk pattern was inversely related to BF% (F = 5.4, p = .0207) and BMI (F = 9.5, p = .0023). Higher intake of the Meat pattern was related to higher levels of BF% (F = 4.5, p = .0346) and BMI (F = 4.2, p = .0418).

CONCLUSION:

These findings support an association between dietary patterns and body composition. Dietary patterns reflect the complex interrelationships inherent in day-to-day eating and are strongly related to differences in BF% and BMI in women.

KEYWORDS:

Body Composition; Eating Behavior; Health focus: nutrition and weight control; Manuscript format: research; Obesity; Outcome measure: biometric and morbidity; Overweight; Prevention Research; Research purpose: relationship testing; Setting: community; Strategy: education; Study design: cross-sectional; Target population age: adults; Target population circumstances: education/income level and geographic location

PMID:
24720387
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.130327-QUAN-129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center