Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y). 2014 Apr 1;4:225. doi: 10.7916/D8V69GM4. eCollection 2014.

Virtual reality feedback cues for improvement of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel ; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine & Research Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.
2
Cognitive Neurology Clinic, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel ; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine & Research Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.
3
Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.
4
Rappaport Faculty of Medicine & Research Institute, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel ; Department of Medicine, Carmel medical Center, Haifa, Israel.
5
Computer Science Department, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our aim was to study the effects of visual feedback cues, responding dynamically to patient's self-motion and provided through a portable see-through virtual reality apparatus, on the walking abilities of patients with Parkinson's disease.

METHODS:

Twenty patients participated. On-line and residual effects on walking speed and stride length were measured.

RESULTS:

Attaching the visual feedback device to the patient with the display turned off showed a negligible effect of about 2%. With the display turned on, 56% of the patients improved either their walking speed, or their stride length, or both, by over 20%. After device removal, and waiting for 15 minutes, the patients were instructed to walk again: 68% of the patients showed over 20% improvement in either walking speed or stride length or both. One week after participating in the first test, 36% of the patients showed over 20% improvement in baseline performance with respect to the previous test. Some of the patients reported that they still walked on the tiles in their minds.

DISCUSSION:

Improvements in walking abilities were measured in patients with Parkinson's disease using virtual reality visual feedback cues. Residual effects suggest the examination of this approach in a comprehensive therapy program.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson's disease; gait disorders; virtual reality; visual cues

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, Columbia University Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center