Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Physiother Can. 2014 Winter;66(1):60-71. doi: 10.3138/ptc.2012-61.

Examining the use of constraint-induced movement therapy in canadian neurological occupational and physical therapy.

Author information

  • 1Laboratory for Brain Recovery and Function ; School of Physiotherapy.
  • 2Laboratory for Brain Recovery and Function ; Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
  • 3School of Physiotherapy ; Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
  • 4Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ; School of Occupational Therapy.
  • 5Division of Occupational Therapy, The Ohio State University Medical Centre, Columbus Ohio, USA.
  • 6Department of Psychiatry ; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience.
  • 7Acquired Brain Injury Service, Capital Health, Halifax, N.S.
  • 8Laboratory for Brain Recovery and Function ; School of Physiotherapy ; Department of Medicine, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience ; School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. ; Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto.

Abstract

in English, French

PURPOSE:

To investigate the use of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in Canadian neurological occupational and physical therapy.

METHOD:

An online survey was completed by occupational and physical therapists practising in Canadian adult neurological rehabilitation. We measured participants' practices, perceptions, and opinions in relation to their use of CIMT in clinical practice.

RESULTS:

A total of 338 surveys were returned for a 13% response rate; 92% of respondents knew of CIMT, and 43% reported using it. The majority (88%) of respondents using CIMT employed a non-traditional protocol. Self-rating of level of CIMT knowledge was found to be a significant predictor of CIMT use (p≤0.001). Commonly identified barriers to use included "patients having cognitive challenges that prohibit use of this treatment" and "lack of knowledge regarding treatment."

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the majority of respondents knew about CIMT, less than half reported using it. Barriers to CIMT use include lack of knowledge about the treatment and institutional resources to support its use. Identifying and addressing barriers to CIMT use-for example, by using continuing professional education to remediate knowledge gaps or developing new protocols that require fewer institutional resources-can help improve the feasibility of CIMT, and thus promote its clinical application.

KEYWORDS:

constraint-induced movement therapy; rehabilitation; stroke; surveys; upper extremity

PMID:
24719511
PMCID:
PMC3941132
DOI:
10.3138/ptc.2012-61
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center