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J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(3):685-708. doi: 10.3233/JAD-131928.

Multivariate data analysis and machine learning in Alzheimer's disease with a focus on structural magnetic resonance imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, London, UK.

Abstract

Machine learning algorithms and multivariate data analysis methods have been widely utilized in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) research in recent years. Advances in medical imaging and medical image analysis have provided a means to generate and extract valuable neuroimaging information. Automatic classification techniques provide tools to analyze this information and observe inherent disease-related patterns in the data. In particular, these classifiers have been used to discriminate AD patients from healthy control subjects and to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. In this paper, recent studies are reviewed that have used machine learning and multivariate analysis in the field of AD research. The main focus is on studies that used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but studies that included positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in addition to MRI are also considered. A wide variety of materials and methods has been employed in different studies, resulting in a range of different outcomes. Influential factors such as classifiers, feature extraction algorithms, feature selection methods, validation approaches, and cohort properties are reviewed, as well as key MRI-based and multi-modal based studies. Current and future trends are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; cerebrospinal fluid; classification; machine learning; magnetic resonance imaging; mild cognitive impairment; multivariate analysis; positron emission tomography

PMID:
24718104
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-131928
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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