Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Health Educ Behav. 2014 Aug;41(4):431-9. doi: 10.1177/1090198114529128. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

Relationship Between Nutritional Knowledge and the Amount of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Consumed in Los Angeles County.

Author information

1
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA lgase@ph.lacounty.gov.
2
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Although consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with many negative health outcomes, including obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, the relationship between consumer nutritional knowledge and the amount consumed is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between knowledge of daily calorie recommendations and the amount of SSBs consumed in a large, economically and racially diverse sample of adults recruited at selected Metro subway and bus shelters in Los Angeles County. In June 2012, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted street intercept surveys to assess food attitudes and consumption behaviors and public opinions related to a recent 8-week health marketing campaign targeting SSB consumption. Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted, including a negative binomial regression model, to examine the relationship between knowledge of the daily calorie recommendations and the amount of SSBs consumed. Among survey respondents (n = 1,041), less than one third correctly identified the daily calorie recommendations for a typical adult. After controlling for sociodemographics and weight status, respondents who correctly identified recommended calorie needs reported, on average, drinking nine fewer SSBs per month than respondents who did not. Results suggest that efforts to reduce SSB consumption might benefit from the inclusion of educational interventions that empower consumers to make healthy choices.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans; health promotion; nutrition; obesity; sugar-sweetened beverages

PMID:
24717193
DOI:
10.1177/1090198114529128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center