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J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;24(4):380-7. doi: 10.1038/jes.2014.21. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

The effects of PM2.5 and its components from indoor and outdoor sources on cough and wheeze symptoms in asthmatic children.

Author information

1
1] Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
2
Department of Community Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
5
Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California, USA.
6
1] Department of Community Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.
7
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.
8
1] Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
9
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) is associated with asthma exacerbation. In the Children's Air Pollution Asthma Study, we investigated the longitudinal association of PM2.5 and its components from indoor and outdoor sources with cough and wheeze symptoms in 36 asthmatic children. The sulfur tracer method was used to estimate infiltration factors. Mixed proportional odds models for an ordinal response were used to relate daily cough and wheeze scores to PM2.5 exposures. The odds ratio associated with being above a given symptom score for a SD increase in PM2.5 from indoor sources (PMIS) was 1.24 (95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.68) for cough and 1.63 (1.11-2.39) for wheeze. Ozone was associated with wheeze (1.82, 1.19-2.80), and cough was associated with indoor PM2.5 components from outdoor sources (denoted with subscript "OS") bromine (BrOS: 1.32, 1.05-1.67), chlorine (ClOS: 1.27, 1.02-1.59) and pyrolyzed organic carbon (OPOS: 1.49, 1.12-1.99). The highest effects were seen in the winter for cough with sulfur (SOS: 2.28, 1.01-5.16) and wheeze with organic carbon fraction 2 (OC2OS: 7.46, 1.19-46.60). Our results indicate that exposure to components originating from outdoor sources of photochemistry, diesel and fuel oil combustion is associated with symptom's exacerbation, especially in the winter. PM2.5 mass of indoor origin was more strongly associated with wheeze than with cough.

PMID:
24714073
DOI:
10.1038/jes.2014.21
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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