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J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2014 Jun;34(6):942-4. doi: 10.1038/jcbfm.2014.58. Epub 2014 Apr 9.

Ultrasound measurements of brain tissue pulsatility correlate with the volume of MRI white-matter hyperintensity.

Author information

1
1] UMR Inserm U930 Imagerie et Cerveau, Tours, France [2] Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours, France.
2
CHRU de Tours Department of Clinique Psychiatrique and Department of Imaging, Tours, France.
3
1] UMR Inserm U930 Imagerie et Cerveau, Tours, France [2] CHRU de Tours Department of Clinique Psychiatrique and Department of Imaging, Tours, France.
4
UMR Inserm U930 Imagerie et Cerveau, Tours, France.
5
1] UMR Inserm U930 Imagerie et Cerveau, Tours, France [2] Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours, France [3] CHRU de Tours Department of Clinique Psychiatrique and Department of Imaging, Tours, France [4] INSERM CIC 1415, Tours, France.
6
1] UMR Inserm U930 Imagerie et Cerveau, Tours, France [2] Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours, France [3] CHRU de Tours Department of Clinique Psychiatrique and Department of Imaging, Tours, France.

Abstract

White-matter hyperintensity (WMH) is frequently seen in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the complete physiopathology of WMH remains to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to determine whether there is an association between the maximum brain tissue displacement (maxBTD), as assessed by ultrasound, and the WMH, as observed by MRI. Nine healthy women aged 60 to 85 years underwent ultrasound and MRI assessments. We found a significant negative correlation between maxBTD and WMH (ρ=-0.86, P<0.001), suggesting a link between cerebral hypoperfusion and WMH.

PMID:
24714033
PMCID:
PMC4050254
DOI:
10.1038/jcbfm.2014.58
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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