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Phytochemistry. 2015 Apr;112:72-9. doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.03.015. Epub 2014 Apr 5.

NO signaling in plant immunity: a tale of messengers.

Author information

1
Université de Bourgogne, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France; ERL CNRS 6300, BP 86510, 21000 Dijon, France.
2
INRA, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France; ERL CNRS 6300, BP 86510, 21000 Dijon, France.
3
CNRS, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France; ERL CNRS 6300, BP 86510, 21000 Dijon, France.
4
AgroSup Dijon, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France; ERL CNRS 6300, BP 86510, 21000 Dijon, France.
5
Université de Bourgogne, UMR 1347 Agroécologie, BP 86510, F-21000 Dijon, France; ERL CNRS 6300, BP 86510, 21000 Dijon, France. Electronic address: wendehen@dijon.inra.fr.

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas involved in a myriad of plant physiological processes including immune responses. How NO mediates its biological effects in plant facing microbial pathogen attack is an unresolved question. Insights into the molecular mechanisms by which it propagates signals reveal the contribution of this simple gas in complex signaling pathways shared with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the second messenger Ca(2+). Understanding of the subtle cross-talks operating between these signals was greatly improved by the recent identification and the functional analysis of proteins regulated through S-nitrosylation, a major NO-dependent post-translational protein modification. Overall, these findings suggest that NO is probably an important component of the mechanism coordinating and regulating Ca(2+) and ROS signaling in plant immunity.

KEYWORDS:

Calcium; Calmodulin; Cell death; Nitric oxide; Reactive oxygen species; Signaling

PMID:
24713571
DOI:
10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.03.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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