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Prog Clin Biol Res. 1989;299:331-8.

Use of a 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 solution in the resuscitation of injured patients in the emergency room.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616.

Abstract

Animal studies and preliminary field patient trials suggest that hypertonic saline solutions can achieve resuscitation of hypovolemic shock with extremely small volumes. In the study reported here, we evaluated the effects of a hypertonic 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD) solution in the resuscitation of patients in the emergency room. Thirty-two patients were randomized into a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial in which 250 ml of either HSD or, as a control, lactated Ringers (LR) was used as the initial fluid for resuscitation of patients with systolic blood pressures of 80 mmHg or less. The test solution was given intravenously, usually through a saphenous vein cut-down, over a period of 2-5 minutes. Conventional isotonic solutions were then given as necessary with an average of 2500 ml of fluid being given over the first 30 minutes of resuscitation. Survival was not improved, and the trial proved to be of most interest with regard to measurement of physiological quantities, which might have been expected to have been substantially abnormal because, in many cases, the measurements were made shortly after the infusion ran in. Very few abnormalities, however, were in fact detected. With the exception of one patient, the highest sodium concentration was 156 mEq/l, the highest chloride concentration was 126 mEq/1, and the highest osmolality was 401 mOsm/kg, and this value was obtained in a patient in the control LR group. Osmolality correlated far better with blood alcohol levels (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient = 0.81) than with any other variable, including sodium and chloride concentrations. The HSD solution was safe to use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
2471213
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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