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Cells. 2012 Dec 19;1(4):1313-27. doi: 10.3390/cells1041313.

Cytoskeletal regulation of dermal regeneration.

Author information

1
Wound Healing Laboratory, Women's and Children's Health Research Institute, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia. xanthe.strudwick@adelaide.edu.au.
2
Wound Healing Laboratory, Women's and Children's Health Research Institute, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia. allison.cowin@adelaide.edu.au.

Abstract

Wound healing results in the repair of injured tissues however fibrosis and scar formation are, more often than not the unfortunate consequence of this process. The ability of lower order vertebrates and invertebrates to regenerate limbs and tissues has been all but lost in mammals; however, there are some instances where glimpses of mammalian regenerative capacity do exist. Here we describe the unlocked potential that exists in mammals that may help us understand the process of regeneration post-injury and highlight the potential role of the actin cytoskeleton in this process. The precise function and regulation of the cytoskeleton is critical to the success of the healing process and its manipulation may therefore facilitate regenerative healing. The gelsolin family of actin remodelling proteins in particular has been shown to have important functions in wound healing and family member Flightless I (Flii) is involved in both regeneration and repair. Understanding the interactions between different cytoskeletal proteins and their dynamic control of processes including cellular adhesion, contraction and motility may assist the development of therapeutics that will stimulate regeneration rather than repair.

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