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Nat Commun. 2014 Apr 7;5:3591. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4591.

Ultra-sensitive liquid biopsy of circulating extracellular vesicles using ExoScreen.

Author information

1
1] Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan [2] Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan [3] Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 102-0083, Japan.
2
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan.
3
1] Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan [2] R&D Department, SRL Inc., Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-0002, Japan.
4
Diagnostics Division, Shionogi & Co., LTD., Settsu-shi, Osaka 566-0022, Japan.
5
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduated School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
6
Department of Frontier Science for Cancer and Chemotherapy, Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
7
Division of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Chuo-ku Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan.
8
Endoscopy Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan.
9
R&D Department, SRL Inc., Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-0002, Japan.
10
Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan.

Abstract

Cancer cells secrete small membranous extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment and circulation. Although their potential as cancer biomarkers has been promising, the identification and quantification of EVs in clinical samples remains challenging. Here we describe a sensitive and rapid analytical technique for profiling circulating EVs directly from blood samples of patients with colorectal cancer. EVs are captured by two types of antibodies and are detected by photosensitizer-beads, which enables us to detect cancer-derived EVs without a purification step. We also show that circulating EVs can be used for detection of colorectal cancer using the antigen CD147, which is embedded in cancer-linked EVs. This work describes a new liquid biopsy technique to sensitively detect disease-specific circulating EVs and provides perspectives in translational medicine from the standpoint of diagnosis and therapy.

PMID:
24710016
PMCID:
PMC3988821
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4591
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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