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Nat Commun. 2014 Apr 8;5:3583. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4583.

Non-volatile organic memory with sub-millimetre bending radius.

Author information

1
1] Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea [2].
2
1] School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea [2].
3
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea.
4
Elements Chemistry Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198, Japan.
5
Materials Characterization Support Unit, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Wako 351-0198, Japan.
6
Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire, Chimie des Polymères, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 8232, 3 rue Galilée, 75252 Ivry, France.
7
Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS), UMR 7504, CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2, France.
8
School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea.
9
1] Elements Chemistry Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198, Japan [2] Department of Physics, CNRS-Ewha International Research Center, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.

Abstract

High-performance non-volatile memory that can operate under various mechanical deformations such as bending and folding is in great demand for the future smart wearable and foldable electronics. Here we demonstrate non-volatile solution-processed ferroelectric organic field-effect transistor memories operating in p- and n-type dual mode, with excellent mechanical flexibility. Our devices contain a ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) thin insulator layer and use a quinoidal oligothiophene derivative (QQT(CN)4) as organic semiconductor. Our dual-mode field-effect devices are highly reliable with data retention and endurance of >6,000 s and 100 cycles, respectively, even after 1,000 bending cycles at both extreme bending radii as low as 500 μm and with sharp folding involving inelastic deformation of the device. Nano-indentation and nano scratch studies are performed to characterize the mechanical properties of organic layers and understand the crucial role played by QQT(CN)4 on the mechanical flexibility of our devices.

PMID:
24709956
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4583

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