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Maturitas. 2014 Jun;78(2):82-5. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.03.004. Epub 2014 Mar 22.

Mild cognitive impairment: safe to drive?

Author information

1
Institute for Ageing & Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing & Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, England, United Kingdom. Electronic address: kirsty.olsen@ncl.ac.uk.
2
Institute for Ageing & Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing & Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, England, United Kingdom. Electronic address: john-paul.taylor@ncl.ac.uk.
3
Institute for Ageing & Health, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing & Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, England, United Kingdom. Electronic address: alan.thomas@ncl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Driving is an important aspect of daily living and for many older people provides autonomy and psycho-social benefits. Cognitive impairment has been found to impact driving skills at the level of dementia, however, uncertainty remains around the impact of a diagnosis of the pre-dementia condition mild cognitive impairment. Current official guidelines are unclear, and assessment of fitness to drive can be problematical. This editorial examines current official guidance available to the clinician and problems with existing assessment as well as the current position of research specifically into MCI and driving, and considers future direction for research in this field.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Driving; Mild cognitive impairment

PMID:
24709165
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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