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Environ Pollut. 2014 Jul;190:36-42. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2014.03.015. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

Black carbon exposure more strongly associated with census tract poverty compared to household income among US black, white, and Latino working class adults in Boston, MA (2003-2010).

Author information

1
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge 717, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: nkrieger@hsph.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: pwaterma@hsph.harvard.edu.
3
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: al.grip@gmail.com.
4
Department of Biostatistics and Department of Environmental Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Building II, Room 413, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: bcoull@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

We investigated the association of individual-level ambient exposure to black carbon (spatiotemporal model-based estimate for latitude and longitude of residential address) with individual, household, and census tract socioeconomic measures among a study sample comprised of 1757 US urban working class white, black and Latino adults (age 25-64) recruited for two studies conducted in Boston, MA (2003-2004; 2008-2010). Controlling for age, study, and exam date, the estimated average annual black carbon exposure for the year prior to study enrollment at the participants' residential address was directly associated with census tract poverty (beta = 0.373; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.322, 0.423) but not with annual household income or education; null associations with race/ethnicity became significant only after controlling for socioeconomic position.

KEYWORDS:

Air pollution; Black carbon; Poverty; Race/ethnicity; Socioeconomic

PMID:
24704809
PMCID:
PMC4701574
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2014.03.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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