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Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2014 Apr;25:111-7. doi: 10.1016/j.sbi.2013.11.001. Epub 2014 Apr 1.

Building a secreting nanomachine: a structural overview of the T3SS.

Author information

1
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE, United Kingdom.
2
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: susan.lea@path.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

To fulfill complex biological tasks, such as locomotion and protein translocation, bacteria assemble macromolecular nanomachines. One such nanodevice, the type III secretion system (T3SS), has evolved to provide a means of transporting proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm across the periplasmic and extracellular spaces. T3SS can be broadly classified into two highly homologous families: the flagellar T3SS which drive cell motility, and the non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS) that inject effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells, a trait frequently associated with virulence. Although the structures and symmetries of ancillary components of the T3SS have diversified to match requirements of different species adapted to different niches, recent genetic, molecular and structural studies demonstrate that these systems are built by arranging homologous modular protein assemblies.

PMID:
24704748
PMCID:
PMC4045390
DOI:
10.1016/j.sbi.2013.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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