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Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2014 May;40(2):311-28. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2014.01.007. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

The structural consequences of calcium crystal deposition.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland.
2
Department of Radiology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland.
3
Division of Rheumatology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland. Electronic address: g.mccarthy@ucd.ie.

Abstract

Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are the most common calcium-containing crystals associated with rheumatic disease. Clinical manifestations of calcium crystal deposition include acute or chronic inflammatory and degenerative arthritides and certain forms of periarthritis. The intra-articular presence of BCP crystals correlates with the degree of radiographic degeneration. Calcium crystal deposition contributes directly to joint degeneration. Vascular calcification is caused by the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in the arterial intima. These deposits may contribute to local inflammation and promote further calcification, thus aggravating the atherosclerotic process. Calcium crystal deposition results in substantial structural consequence in humans.

KEYWORDS:

Arthritis; Atherosclerosis; Basic calcium phosphate; Calcium crystals; Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate; Vascular calcification

PMID:
24703349
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2014.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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