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Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2014 May;40(2):155-75. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2014.01.001. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Epidemiology of gout.

Author information

1
Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK. Electronic address: e.roddy@keele.ac.uk.
2
Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Abstract

Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis in men. The findings of several epidemiologic studies from a diverse range of countries suggest that the prevalence of gout has risen over the past few decades. Although incidence data are scarce, data from the United States suggests that the incidence of gout is also rising. Evidence from prospective epidemiologic studies has confirmed dietary factors (animal purines, alcohol, and fructose), obesity, the metabolic syndrome, hypertension, diuretic use, and chronic kidney disease as clinically relevant risk factors for hyperuricemia and gout. Low-fat dairy products, coffee, and vitamin C seem to have a protective effect.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Etiology; Gout; Hyperuricemia; Incidence; Prevalence

PMID:
24703341
PMCID:
PMC4119792
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2014.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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