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Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Apr 3;14(4):473-85. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2013.12.012.

Dynamics of HSPC repopulation in nonhuman primates revealed by a decade-long clonal-tracking study.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
2
Korean Bioinformation Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 111 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806, Korea.
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
4
Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH, Rockville, MD 20850, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Department of Biomathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
6
Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
7
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
8
UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
9
Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Electronic address: syuchen@mednet.ucla.edu.

Abstract

In mice, clonal tracking of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has revealed variations in repopulation characteristics. However, it is unclear whether similar properties apply in primates. Here, we examined this issue through tracking of thousands of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in rhesus macaques for up to 12 years. Approximately half of the clones analyzed contributed to long-term repopulation (over 3-10 years), arising in sequential groups and likely representing self-renewing HSCs. The remainder contributed primarily for the first year. The long-lived clones could be further subdivided into functional groups contributing primarily to myeloid, lymphoid, or both myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Over time, the 4%-10% of clones with robust dual lineage contribution predominated in repopulation. HSPCs expressing a CCR5 shRNA transgene behaved similarly to controls. Our study therefore documents HSPC behavior in a clinically relevant model over a long time frame and provides a substantial system-level data set that is a reference point for future work.

PMID:
24702996
PMCID:
PMC4009343
DOI:
10.1016/j.stem.2013.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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