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PLoS One. 2014 Apr 2;9(4):e93386. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093386. eCollection 2014.

The gut of geographically disparate Ciona intestinalis harbors a core microbiota.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida College of Medicine, USF Health, St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America.
2
Division of Neonatology, University of South Florida College of Medicine, USF Health, St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America.
3
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
4
Post-Baccalaureate Program in Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, United States of America.
5
College of Marine Sciences, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America.
6
Department of Animal Physiology and Evolution, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy.
7
Department of Molecular Genetics, All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, Florida, United States of America.
8
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratories, University of Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

Abstract

It is now widely understood that all animals engage in complex interactions with bacteria (or microbes) throughout their various life stages. This ancient exchange can involve cooperation and has resulted in a wide range of evolved host-microbial interdependencies, including those observed in the gut. Ciona intestinalis, a filter-feeding basal chordate and classic developmental model that can be experimentally manipulated, is being employed to help define these relationships. Ciona larvae are first exposed internally to microbes upon the initiation of feeding in metamorphosed individuals; however, whether or not these microbes subsequently colonize the gut and whether or not Ciona forms relationships with specific bacteria in the gut remains unknown. In this report, we show that the Ciona gut not only is colonized by a complex community of bacteria, but also that samples from three geographically isolated populations reveal striking similarity in abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consistent with the selection of a core community by the gut ecosystem.

PMID:
24695540
PMCID:
PMC3973685
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0093386
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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