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Am Fam Physician. 2014 Feb 15;89(4):273-8.

Thyroid disease in pregnancy.

Author information

1
Naval Hospital Pensacola Family Medicine Residency Program, Pensacola, FL, USA.
2
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Erratum in

  • Am Fam Physician. 2014 Jul 1;90(1):8. Dosage error in article text.

Abstract

Thyroid disease is the second most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, and when untreated during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, placental abruption, hypertensive disorders, and growth restriction. Current guidelines recommend targeted screening of women at high risk, including those with a history of thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, or other autoimmune disease; current or past use of thyroid therapy; or a family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Appropriate management results in improved outcomes, demonstrating the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment. In women with hypothyroidism, levothyroxine is titrated to achieve a goal serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level less than 2.5 mIU per L. The preferred treatment for hyperthyroidism is antithyroid medications, with a goal of maintaining a serum free thyroxine level in the upper one-third of the normal range. Postpartum thyroiditis is the most common form of postpartum thyroid dysfunction and may present as hyper- or hypothyroidism. Symptomatic treatment is recommended for the former; levothyroxine is indicated for the latter in women who are symptomatic, breastfeeding, or who wish to become pregnant.

PMID:
24695447
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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