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Res Dev Disabil. 2014 Jun;35(6):1292-300. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.03.029. Epub 2014 Mar 30.

Effect of visual attention on postural control in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Author information

1
UMR1141, INSERM - Université Paris Diderot, Hôpital Robert Debré, 48 Boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. Electronic address: mariapia.bucci@gmail.com.
2
e(ye)BRAIN, 1 bis rue Jean le Galleu, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine, France(1).
3
Service de Psychopathologie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent, Hôpital Robert Debré, 48 Boulevard Sérurier 75019 Paris, France.
4
Service d'Ophtalmologie, Hôpital Robert Debré, 48 Boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France.

Abstract

We compared the effect of oculomotor tasks on postural sway in two groups of ADHD children with and without methylphenidate (MPH) treatment against a group of control age-matched children. Fourteen MPH-untreated ADHD children, fourteen MPH-treated ADHD children and a group of control children participated to the study. Eye movements were recorded using a video-oculography system and postural sway measured with a force platform simultaneously. Children performed fixation, pursuits, pro- and anti-saccades. We analyzed the number of saccades during fixation, the number of catch-up saccades during pursuits, the latency of pro- and anti-saccades; the occurrence of errors in the anti-saccade task and the surface and mean velocity of the center of pressure (CoP). During the postural task, the quality of fixation was significantly worse in both groups of ADHD children with respect to control children; in contrast, the number of catch-up saccades during pursuits, the latency of pro-/anti-saccades and the rate of errors in the anti-saccade task did not differ in the three groups of children. The surface of the CoP in MPH-treated children was similar to that of control children, while MPH-untreated children showed larger postural sway. When performing any saccades, the surface of the CoP improved with respect to fixation or pursuits tasks. This study provides evidence of poor postural control in ADHD children, probably due to cerebellar deficiencies. Our study is also the first to show an improvement on postural sway in ADHD children performing saccadic eye movements.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; Children; Dual-task; Eye movements; Methylphenidate; Posture

PMID:
24691355
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2014.03.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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