Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.03.047. Epub 2014 Mar 30.

Maternal diet, prenatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds and birth outcomes in a European prospective mother-child study (NewGeneris).

Author information

1
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Lovisenberggata 8, 0456 Oslo, Norway; Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Pompeu Fabra University, Plaça de la Mercè 10-12, 08002 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: Eleni.Papadopoulou@fhi.no.
2
Pompeu Fabra University, Plaça de la Mercè 10-12, 08002 Barcelona, Spain; Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Melchor Fernández Almagro 3-5, 28029 Madrid, Spain; National School of Public Health, Alexandras Avenue 196, 11521 Athens, Greece.
3
National Hellenic Research Foundation, Institute of Biological Research and Biotechnology, Vassileos Constantinou Avenue 48, 11635 Athens, Greece.
4
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Pompeu Fabra University, Plaça de la Mercè 10-12, 08002 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Melchor Fernández Almagro 3-5, 28029 Madrid, Spain; INSERM (National Institute of Health Medical Research), Team of Environmental Epidemiology Applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Institute Albert Bonniot, BP 170, La Tronche, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, France.
5
BioDetection Systems B.V., Science Park 406, 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.
7
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.
8
Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.
9
Bradford Institute for Health Research, Temple Bank House, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Duckworth Lane, Bradford BD9 6RJ, UK.
10
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Parc de Salut Mar, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department, Passeig Marítim 25-29, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.
11
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Pompeu Fabra University, Plaça de la Mercè 10-12, 08002 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Melchor Fernández Almagro 3-5, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
12
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Lovisenberggata 8, 0456 Oslo, Norway.
13
Department of Social Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, Voutes Campus, Heraklion, Crete GR-71003, Greece.
14
Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Clinical Trials, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa, Italy.
15
Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, 6229ER Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Maternal diet can result in exposure to environmental contaminants including dioxins which may influence foetal growth. We investigated the association between maternal diet and birth outcomes by defining a dioxin-rich diet. We used validated food frequency questionnaires to assess the diet of pregnant women from Greece, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark and Norway and estimated plasma dioxin-like activity by the Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression (DR-CALUX®) bioassay in 604 maternal blood samples collected at delivery. We applied reduced rank regression to identify a dioxin-rich dietary pattern based on dioxin-like activity (DR-CALUX®) levels in maternal plasma, and calculated a dioxin-diet score as an estimate of adherence to this dietary pattern. In the five country population, dioxin-diet score was characterised by high consumption of red and white meat, lean and fatty fish, low-fat dairy and low consumption of salty snacks and high-fat cheese, during pregnancy. The upper tertile of the dioxin-diet score was associated with a change in birth weight of -121g (95% confidence intervals: -232, -10g) compared to the lower tertile after adjustment for confounders. A small non-significant reduction in gestational age was also observed (-1.4days, 95% CI: -3.8, 1.0days). Our results suggest that maternal diet might contribute to the exposure of the foetus to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and may be related to reduced birth weight. More studies are needed to develop updated dietary guidelines for women of reproductive age, aiming to the reduction of dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.

KEYWORDS:

Birth weight; Cohort study; DR-CALUX; Dietary patterns; Dioxins; Pregnancy

PMID:
24691212
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.03.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center