Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PeerJ. 2014 Mar 4;2:e285. doi: 10.7717/peerj.285. eCollection 2014.

Lack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: a survey of the problem and potential solutions.

Author information

1
Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, University of Tromsø , Tromsø , Norway.
2
Centre for Biological Sciences, University of Southampton , Southampton , United Kingdom.
3
Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark.
4
Department of Biology, Stanford University , Stanford , USA.
5
Biology Department, Simon Fraser University , Burnaby, BC , Canada.
6
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Evolutionary Biodemography Laboratory , Rostock , Germany ; School of Biological Sciences, Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science, University of Queensland , Brisbane , Australia.
7
Department of Ecology, Lincoln University , Canterbury , New Zealand.
8
Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski , Rimouski (QC) , Canada ; Québec Centre for Biodiversity Sciences, McGill University , Canada.

Abstract

Proficiency in mathematics and statistics is essential to modern ecological science, yet few studies have assessed the level of quantitative training received by ecologists. To do so, we conducted an online survey. The 937 respondents were mostly early-career scientists who studied biology as undergraduates. We found a clear self-perceived lack of quantitative training: 75% were not satisfied with their understanding of mathematical models; 75% felt that the level of mathematics was "too low" in their ecology classes; 90% wanted more mathematics classes for ecologists; and 95% more statistics classes. Respondents thought that 30% of classes in ecology-related degrees should be focused on quantitative disciplines, which is likely higher than for most existing programs. The main suggestion to improve quantitative training was to relate theoretical and statistical modeling to applied ecological problems. Improving quantitative training will require dedicated, quantitative classes for ecology-related degrees that contain good mathematical and statistical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Ecology student; Education; Mathematics; Statistics; Student; Teaching; University curriculum

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PeerJ, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center