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J Psychiatr Res. 2014 Jul;54:55-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.03.004. Epub 2014 Mar 18.

The neuropsychology of self-reflection in psychiatric illness.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6001 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, WI 53719, USA. Electronic address: cphilippi@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6001 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, WI 53719, USA. Electronic address: mrkoenigs@wisc.edu.

Abstract

The development of robust neuropsychological measures of social and affective function-which link critical dimensions of mental health to their underlying neural circuitry-could be a key step in achieving a more pathophysiologically-based approach to psychiatric medicine. In this article, we summarize research indicating that self-reflection (the inward attention to personal thoughts, memories, feelings, and actions) may be a useful model for developing such a paradigm, as there is evidence that self-reflection is (1) measurable with self-report scales and performance-based tests, (2) linked to the activity of a specific neural circuit, and (3) dimensionally related to mental health and various forms of psychopathology.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Autism; Default mode network; Depression; Medial prefrontal cortex; Neuropsychology; Psychiatric illness; Psychopathy; Rest-state functional neuroimaging; Self-reflection

PMID:
24685311
PMCID:
PMC4022422
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.03.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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