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Fam Syst Health. 2014 Mar;32(1):20-30. doi: 10.1037/a0035121.

Examining the utility of behavioral health integration in well-child visits: implications for rural settings.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology.
2
Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences, University of Oregon.
3
College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center.
4
Complete Children's Health.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of integrating behavioral health services into well-child visits in underserved, remote, and/or fringe areas. Specifically, the following were examined: the structure of the well-child visit for standard care in comparison to when a behavioral health provider was integrated into the visit and the effect of integrating a behavioral health provider on behavioral health topics covered and parent satisfaction. Participants were 94 caregivers of children attending well-child visits. Group differences were examined for participants in well-child visits with a behavioral health provider and participants in a standard well-child visit. Findings suggest a statistically significant increase in caregiver-rated perception for the number of topics covered with the integration of a behavioral health provider in the well-child visits. No significant effects of caregiver-rated helpfulness or satisfaction were observed. Implications for the findings and future research directions are discussed.

PMID:
24684153
DOI:
10.1037/a0035121
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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