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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Oct;12(10):1688-94. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2014.03.021. Epub 2014 Mar 26.

Measures of adiposity are associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Gastroenterology, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Mountain View, California.
4
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: achan@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Obesity is associated with systemic inflammation, alterations in the intestinal microbiome, and decreased epithelial integrity. The association between obesity and peptic ulcer has not been investigated thoroughly.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective cohort study of 47,120 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (mean age at baseline, 54 y). Biennially, we updated information on body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin. Self-reported waist and hip measurements were validated among a subsample of participants. Self-reported cases of gastric and duodenal ulcers were confirmed by medical record review. Helicobacter pylori status was determined from endoscopic biopsy specimens, serum antibody measurements, and/or stool antigen assays documented in the medical record. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

We documented 272 gastric and 320 duodenal ulcers over 24 years of follow-up evaluation. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for gastric ulcer was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.20-2.78; P(trend) < .01) for obese men (BMI, ≥30.0 kg/m(2)), compared with men with BMIs of 23.0 to 24.9 kg/m(2), and 1.88 (95% CI, 1.06-3.33; P(trend) = .04) for men with waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) of 1.00 or higher, compared with men with a WHR of 0.85 to 0.89. The risk of duodenal ulcer was not associated with BMI (P(trend) = .24) or WHR (P(trend) = .68). In secondary analyses, increased BMI and WHR each were associated with increased risk of H pylori-negative, but not H pylori-positive, ulcers. The effect of BMI on ulcer risk did not change with use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol consumption, physical activity, or smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a large prospective cohort of male health professionals, central and total obesity were associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer-particularly gastric and H pylori-negative ulcers.

KEYWORDS:

Body Mass Index; Obesity; Peptic Ulcer Disease; Waist-To-Hip Ratio

PMID:
24681076
PMCID:
PMC4171187
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2014.03.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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