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Cytokine. 2014 May;67(1):7-12. doi: 10.1016/j.cyto.2014.02.001. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Human monocytes produce interferon-gamma upon stimulation with LPS.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Immunology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.rowshani@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

Representing a crucial T-helper 1 cytokine, IFN-γ acts as an important bridge between innate and adaptive immunity and is involved in many acute and chronic pathologic states, such as autoimmune diseases and solid organ transplant rejection. At present, debate still prevails about the ability of human monocytes to produce IFN-γ. We aimed to investigate whether human monocytes possess the capacity to produce IFN-γ at mRNA and protein level. Using real time PCR, flow cytometric analysis and ELISA, we investigated the capacity of freshly isolated CD14+ monocytes of healthy individuals and kidney transplant recipients to produce IFN-γ after stimulation with IFN-γ and LPS or LPS alone. We observed increased IFN-γ mRNA levels in CD14+ monocytes after stimulation as compared to the unstimulated controls in both populations. In addition, stimulation with IFN-γ and LPS or LPS alone led to a significant increase in the percentage of CD14+ monocytes producing TNF-α and IFN-γ at protein level (p<0.05). A trend towards increased secreted IFN-γ production in supernatants was also observed after LPS stimulation using ELISA. We conclude that human monocytes from healthy individuals and kidney transplant recipients possess the capacity to produce IFN-γ.

KEYWORDS:

IFN-γ; LPS; Macrophage; Monocytes; Transplantation

PMID:
24680476
DOI:
10.1016/j.cyto.2014.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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