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Ann Emerg Med. 2014 Nov;64(5):469-81. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2014.02.010. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

Lack of association between Press Ganey emergency department patient satisfaction scores and emergency department administration of analgesic medications.

Author information

1
Alpert Medical School of Brown University.
2
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Brown University; Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University; Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI. Electronic address: rmerchant@lifespan.org.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

We explore the relationship between Press Ganey emergency department (ED) patient satisfaction scores and ED administration of analgesic medications, including amount of opioid analgesics received, among patients who completed a patient satisfaction survey.

METHODS:

We conducted a secondary data analysis of Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction surveys from patients discharged from 2 academic, urban EDs October 2009 to September 2011. We matched survey responses to data on opioid and nonopioid analgesics administered in the ED, demographic characteristics, and temporal factors from the ED electronic medical records. We used polytomous logistic regression to compare quartiles of overall Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction scores to administration of analgesic medications, opioid analgesics, and number of morphine equivalents received. We adjusted models for demographic and hospital characteristics and temporal factors.

RESULTS:

Of the 4,749 patients who returned surveys, 48.5% received analgesic medications, and 29.6% received opioid analgesics during their ED visit. Mean overall Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction scores for patients receiving either analgesic medications or opioid analgesics were lower than for those who did not receive these medications. In the univariable polytomous logistic regression analysis, receipt of analgesic medications, opioid analgesics, and a greater number of morphine equivalents were associated with lower overall scores. However, in the multivariable analysis, receipt of analgesic medications or opioid analgesics was not associated with overall scores, and receipt of greater morphine equivalents was inconsistently associated with lower overall scores.

CONCLUSION:

Overall Press Ganey ED patient satisfaction scores were not primarily based on in-ED receipt of analgesic medications or opioid analgesics; other factors appear to be more important.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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