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Food Chem. 2014 Aug 15;157:141-7. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.02.025. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Allergenic properties and differential response of walnut subjected to processing treatments.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, University of Bonn Medical Center, Sigmund-Freud-Str., 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany; Servicio de Alergia, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Instituto de Investigación Hospital 12 de Octubre (i+12), Avenida de Córdoba s/n, 28041 Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: Beatriz.Cabanillas@ukb.uni-bonn.de.
2
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service, Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E. Lee Boulevard, New Orleans, LA, USA.
3
Servicio de Alergia, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Instituto de Investigación Hospital 12 de Octubre (i+12), Avenida de Córdoba s/n, 28041 Madrid, Spain.
4
University of California, School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility 451 E. Health Sciences Drive, Suite 6510, Davis, CA, USA.
5
Departamento de Tecnología de Alimentos, SGIT-INIA, Ctra. de La Coruña km 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
6
Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
7
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, University of Bonn Medical Center, Sigmund-Freud-Str., 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate changes in walnut allergenicity after processing treatments by in vitro techniques and physiologically relevant assays. The allergenicity of walnuts subjected to high hydrostatic pressure and thermal/pressure treatments was evaluated by IgE-immunoblot and antibodies against walnut major allergen Jug r 4. The ability of processed walnut to cross-link IgE on effector cells was evaluated using a rat basophil leukaemia cell line and by skin prick testing. Susceptibility to gastric and duodenal digestion was also evaluated. The results showed that walnuts subjected to pressure treatment at 256 kPa, 138 °C, were able to diminish the IgE cross-linking capacity on effector cells more efficiently than high pressure treated walnuts. IgE immunoblot confirmed these results. Moreover, higher susceptibility to digestion of pressure treated walnut proteins was observed. The use of processed walnuts with decreased IgE binding capacity could be a potential strategy for walnut tolerance induction.

KEYWORDS:

High pressure; Processing; Thermal treatments; Tree nut allergy; Walnut allergy

PMID:
24679763
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.02.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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