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Cell. 2014 Mar 27;157(1):26-40. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.005.

Remote control of gene function by local translation.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Brain Research Institute, and Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, South Korea.
2
Patrick Wild Centre, Centre for Integrative Physiology, Hugh Robson Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, UK.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1A3, Canada. Electronic address: nahum.sonenberg@mcgill.ca.
4
Department of Physiology Development and Neuroscience, Anatomy Building, Downing Street, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3DY, UK. Electronic address: ceh33@cam.ac.uk.

Abstract

The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function.

PMID:
24679524
PMCID:
PMC3988848
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2014.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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