Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Apr;133(4):943-50; quiz 51. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.02.015.

Innate lymphoid cells and asthma.

Author information

1
Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
2
Department of Medical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Genentech, South San Francisco, Calif. Electronic address: umetsud@gene.com.

Abstract

Asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease with several phenotypes, including an allergic asthma phenotype characterized by TH2 cytokine production and associated with allergen sensitization and adaptive immunity. Asthma also includes nonallergic asthma phenotypes, such as asthma associated with exposure to air pollution, infection, or obesity, that require innate rather than adaptive immunity. These innate pathways that lead to asthma involve macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, newly described cell types that produce a variety of cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-13. We review the recent data regarding innate lymphoid cells and their role in asthma.

KEYWORDS:

Airway hyperreactivity; allergy; asthma; influenza; innate lymphoid cells; natural killer T cells

PMID:
24679467
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2014.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center